If bearness ends up being pointless, I guess I will keep being a bear.

Hello, I am a bear


I like to believe being a bear has a point and, therefore, my bearness has a point. I am a bear in the forest, and it is nice to think that matters to something or somewhere to some end. Maybe the forest needs me and my bearness. Maybe some other creature needs me and my bearness. Maybe me just needing my bearness to be a bear is enough for my bearness to have a point.

I like to believe that.

But maybe being a bear is not supposed to have a point. No end. No meaning. Maybe I am a bear because I am a bear, that is all there is to it. That is a little scary, but it is also a little nice. If being a bear is truly pointless, it takes a great deal of pressure off of me and all the expectations I impose upon my…

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Lessons from a real and metaphorical mountain climb

Untangled

I always used the metaphor of climbing a mountain to describe my healing journey. Then I was able to experience a real mountain climb. These are the lessons from a real and metaphorical mountain climb

  • The road to the trailhead is wrought with bumps, divots, potholes, and dusty uneven terrain. It is hot, cold, sunny, cloudy, ever-changing but it’s possible to start the hike by crossing a wooden bridge at the trailhead, or climb the stairs to the safety of my therapists’ office.
  • The air at the trailhead is cleaner, crisper, and alive with possibility and excitement. As I breathe in, my lungs are filled with clean air and I want to take deep cleansing breaths. As I begin to climb into unfamiliar altitude my lungs keep me from moving too fast and I find I gasping for air. I have to remind myself to breathe. I listen to how my…

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Live in that Self-Belief moment

My Joyous Feature

In that self-belief moment, there’s that power to open up. Feeling worthy of all. An empower moment that shall take it to that special value.

A self-conscious mind can take that courage into that self-belief moment. In that powered mind, there’s that true opinion that shall lead to it.

Life has that cherishing figure into a moment beyond self-belief. Assuming the facts that things will bring that empowerment into that conscious mind. Feeling free for that very moment. A visualization can cherish that moment of gratitude and wisdom. It can be the voice of the self-brief.

There’s a moment beyond self-brief that can nourish that time and knowledge. Heading into that respected life. There’s nothing into a moment that’s fading out.

The experience through self-belief is learning so many matters. Matters that can learn from the past and can be used in the present. It will then shall lead into…

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Trees in Transistion IX

aspiblog

INTRODUCTION

It has been a few days since I did one of these posts. While plenty of the trees have shed most or all of their leaves some are still quite green.

THE TREES

I have two sets of tree pictures to share, the second of which were taken only yesterday evening.

The ones from yesterday evening:

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Book suggestions for Pit Bull Awareness Day (October 27th, 2013)

The Ontario Pit Bull Ban is now 12 years old.

Art by Nicole Corrado

It has been 8 years since Ontario implemented the controversial pi bull ban.  The ban doesn’t protect people, but has become an animal welfare concern.  To learn more about pit bulls and breed-specific legislation, here are a few book suggestions:

Dog Lost, (written by Ingrid Lee, published in 2010 by Chicken House), introduces children to the problems with breed-specific legislation.  As a small city is preposing a ban on pit bulls, a pit bull puppy gets lost  While pit bulls are being maligned, this puppy manages to become a hero not only to people in his community, but also to the dozens of shelter pit bulls whose lives are at risk from the proposed ban.  Dog Lost provides a detailed, balanced view of breed banning, while remaining hopeful for breed banning to end.

Dogtown, (written by Stefan Bechtel, published in 2010 by National Geographic), tells the true stories…

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